Review—The Tumbling Turner Sisters by Juliette Fay

In Juliette Fay’s The Tumbling Turner Sisters, Gert and Winnie Turner narrate the tragedies and triumphs of their lives, and everything in between. Fay’s gorgeous prose lends itself to this touching story of the four Turner girls, their mother Ethel and father Frank, and the extended family they acquire as they take the stage during the vaudeville era.

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Review—My Lady Jane by Ashton, Hand, and Meadows

I loved this wonderful romp through a slightly revised Tudor period of British history by  authors Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows. During the reign of Edward Tudor, the contention in the country is not between Catholics and Protestants, but between Eðians and Verities. Those who are Eðian, like Edward’s father King Henry VIII, could change from human to animal form at will (Henry, not surprisingly, was a lion). Verities, on the other hand, believed Eðians were an abomination and that England should be purified of their presence. So, in a country torn between two factions, with a sickly king, not much could go wrong, right?

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Review—Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye

In Jane Steele, Lyndsay Faye reimagines the classic novel Jane Eyre. But, even readers unfamiliar with Brontë’s work will enjoy Jane Steele, because the work amazes and astonishes (sorry, had to slip a Hamilton reference in there) of its own accord.

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Review—Flight of Dreams by Ariel Lawhon

I love historical fiction. There’s a part of me that will always be in love with British history (and the scandals that go along with it!) and historical fiction from across the pond. Lawhon’s Flight of Dreams has made me broaden my taste in historical fiction. I loved Flight of Dreams: the writing, the characters, and the curiosity it encouraged in me. That curiosity, by the way, is one of the reasons I love historical fiction the most. Because I always want to ask, “Did it REALLY happen that way? How did it really end?”

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