Review—Difficult Women by Roxane Gay

It’s no secret that I admire Roxane Gay for her ability to write (An Untamed State broke me, and Bad Feminist was at turns funny, raw, and made me be so reflective it hurt to think). Her new collection of short stories out today, Difficult Women, shares the story of women—women too strong for life, who keep secrets, who give too much of themselves or choose to keep enough of themselves sacred and untouchable. It tells the story of women as we are—not how other people wish we would be.

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Blog Tour and Review—The Shadow Hour by Melissa Grey

In Melissa Grey’s The Shadow Hour, Echo is a different person. This is to be expected after the events of The Girl at Midnight, which I discussed my love for here. But there was more to it than just a physical/metaphysical transformation. No, in this book, Echo has learned and done so much more than she wanted to.

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Review—The Gallery of Lost Species by Nina Berkhout

In Nina Berkhout’s The Gallery of Lost Species, Edith Walker comes of age in the shadow of her older sister, Vivienne (Viv). Viv, whom Edith always characterizes as more talented and more beautiful, was trotted around to beauty pageants by their mother Constance, while Henry, their painter and artist father, encouraged the artistic tendencies in both of the young girls. In addition to being a pageant beauty, Viv was also an accomplished artist and painter, and Edith always felt as though her gift for collecting and categorizing items paled in the shadow of Viv’s talent.

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Blog Tour and Review—There Once Were Stars by Melanie McFarlane

This fast-paced, dramatic dystopian YA offering from Melanie McFarlane hearkens back to The Giver and 1984, but gives us a whole new world in Dome 1618.

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Review—The Crown’s Game by Evelyn Skye

In this fantastical re-imagining of Russian history, Evelyn Skye places two potential Imperial Enchanters, Nikolai and Vika. Mentored from childhood, both magicians must now compete in The Crown’s Game, and find out who will become the Tsar’s Enchanter, and who will lose more than just the game.

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Review—Flight of Dreams by Ariel Lawhon

I love historical fiction. There’s a part of me that will always be in love with British history (and the scandals that go along with it!) and historical fiction from across the pond. Lawhon’s Flight of Dreams has made me broaden my taste in historical fiction. I loved Flight of Dreams: the writing, the characters, and the curiosity it encouraged in me. That curiosity, by the way, is one of the reasons I love historical fiction the most. Because I always want to ask, “Did it REALLY happen that way? How did it really end?”

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Review—A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourn

First off, I am such a fan of Deanna Raybourn’s Lady Julia Grey series (as well as a fan of her sharp tongue and general awesomeness on Twitter), that I offered my firstborn in return for very nearly begged for a copy of this ARC. I was beyond thrilled when I was finally granted access via NetGalley.

Of course I read it straightaway, and I was not disappointed.

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Review—We Never Asked for Wings by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

Being a parent is never easy, nor is learning how to be a parent after avoiding it for fifteen years. This is the lesson Letty Espinosa has to learn after her mother, Maria Elena, leaves her to go to her husband, who has returned to Mexico after living in San Francisco for Letty’s whole life. Her son, Alex, must also learn to allow his mother to love him in this compelling novel from Vanessa Diffenbaugh.

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